$99 Weekend Special Canada & West Coast Locations

Read More
Call Us: 1-877-270-8267

4.8 / 5 average star rating

Over 90,000 happy travelers

200+ bookings in the last week

Categories

Get our top tips for saving money on a campervan trip:

The 2020 coronavirus pandemic has had an immense impact on travel worldwide, with many restrictions and closures forcing all types of travel to a grinding halt.  The spread of the disease has begun to recede in many areas, allowing for a multi-phase reopening of recreation areas.  The restrictions and closures vary both by state as well as by region within each state.  Here is a listing of general travel resources, as well as a list of the current status (as of June 1, 2020) of larger parks, recreation, and camping areas in the regions of Escape Campervan’s rental depots.

This is by no means exhaustive, and we recommend you thoroughly research travel restrictions, quarantine requirements, and park/land closures prior to planning any trips.  Many states have restrictions or bans on non-essential (i.e. recreation) travel. In addition, the health risks associated with both land and air travel should be seriously considered prior to traveling. Many areas and businesses require masks when social distancing cannot be maintained, and we always recommend that travelers adhere to the rules and requirements of the areas you are visiting.  Use caution if traveling to remote areas as healthcare facilities may be difficult to access if you were to become ill. Most importantly, smaller towns have decreased capability to manage an influx of patients.

If you are feeling ill or experiencing any coronavirus symptoms you should not travel and should quarantine yourself immediately to avoid spread of the disease.

CDC Travel Guidelines

While most states don’t have an outright travel ban, many are urging caution with travel, particularly air travel and interstate travel. Moreover, some states are discouraging non-essential travel at this time while others have mandatory quarantine periods for visitors. Check with each state’s tourism board or health department for any restrictions.

Click here for a current list of National Park service alerts by state.

All non-essential (i.e. tourism and recreation) travel between the United States-Canada border is currently restricted.  This applies to all foreign nationals, including immediate family members, such as spouses/partners.

Campers sit near a van in the forest.

State by state information:

Arizona

  • Arizona state parks are open for camping and recreation, however historic parks remain closed and most tours are not running.  Kartchner Caverns State Park will be running limited cave tours by reservation only.
  • Sedona – Trails and parks are open; for a listing of specific restrictions and available services click here.
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands are open for public use, though some local restrictions may apply.  Restrooms may not be available.  Day use fees have been waived for the time being.
    • Daily walk-in permits to hike Coyote Buttes North (the Wave) and Coyote Buttes South have been temporarily suspended.  The 10 daily walk-in permits will now be available online.  From the website: “permits previously available through the walk-in lottery will temporarily be available on Recreation.gov. Putting this “walk-in” lottery online means it will match the regular online lottery system, which is three months in advance. You could enter the online lottery in June; permits would be issued on July 1 for hiking in October”
  • Navajo Nation – The Navajo Nation has been particularly hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, and outside travel could have a devastating effect on additional disease spread.  For the safety and protection of their citizens, all Navajo Nation Tribal Parks (Monument Valley, Antelope Canyon for example) remain closed.  The current executive order from the Navajo Nation extends through June 7, with no date set for a reopening.

Arizona National Parks:

  • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area – areas are reopening, with some campgrounds/RV parks open for camping.
  • Grand Canyon National Park – South Rim is open for day use from 4 am-2pm through June 4.  Starting June 5, South Rim will be open 24/7, and Mather Campground will be open (reservation only).  North Rim will be open for day use.
  • Saguaro National Park – All park roads and trails are open.  Restrooms are open and water is available.  Visitor Center is closed.

California

Local travel only is being strongly encouraged throughout California.  For a listing of updated recommendations, reopening information, and restrictions from local tourism offices and health departments, click here.

  • Camping at California state parks is currently suspended (as of June 1, 2020).  They are urging local travel only.  Camping reservations are available for dates in late Summer and Fall but are subject to possible cancellation as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to develop.  Each state park website has detailed information on current closures and restrictions.
  • The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is maintaining a list of closed BLM areas throughout California.  As areas reopen, they are removed from the site.
  • US Forest Service lands are open but with restrictions. In addition, there are campfire restrictions in place in many places.  It is best to visit the individual forest service region site or contact them directly to determine which areas are accessible and what closures may be in place.

California National Parks:

Colorado

  • State parks and wildlife areas are open for camping and taking reservations online.   Some counties and a few state wildlife areas still have restrictions in place so be sure to check this before you go and contact the park directly if there is any question. Visitor centers, showers, picnic areas, and any areas of group congregation remain closed.
  • Private campgrounds are open as of May 25.
  • The BLM is maintaining a list of areas with restrictions or closures, as well as regional contact information.
  • US Forest Service lands are open, and detailed information on campground opening status, reservations, dates, etc. can be found on the individual National Forest Service area page.  Check out this map for an easy link to each Forest Service area with current restrictions and camping/recreation information.
  • Rocky Mountain National Park is entering phase 2 of their reopening;  timed entry permits or a camping reservation are required for entry;  these are available through recreation.gov.

Florida

Florida’s tourism website has a comprehensive guide on the current opening status of businesses, parks, theme parks, beaches, and other tourism destinations within the state; start here for information on planning a trip.  Currently (as of June 1) there is a mandatory 14-day quarantine for travelers arriving from New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Louisiana.

  • Florida state parks are open for recreation and camping; camping may be at reduced capacity to maintain distancing.  Individual park hours and amenities may be reduced – check with specific parks for details before visiting.
  • Florida’s National Forest Service lands are open for recreation and camping use with campground and dispersed camping available;  some areas may still have restrictions or partial closures so it is best to check with the individual regions (Ocala, Apalachicola, and Osceola for specific information and questions).
  • Disney World will begin a phased park reopening on July 11:
    • July 11:  Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom
    • July 15: Epcot and Hollywood Studios
    • June 22:  Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground
  • Universal Orlando is open with safety measures in place
  • Sea World has no opening date currently
  • LegoLand has reopened as of June 1

Florida National Parks

New York / Northeast

New York City had a particularly severe outbreak of COVID-19. The more rural areas in New York State experienced fewer cases due to decreased population density. Limited local travel only is being recommended for New York and New Jersey. Parks are open but local travel only is being encouraged. Camping will be available but limited. Many states in the northeast currently have additional restrictions. For example, New Hampshire state parks will be open to residents only. Maine and Vermont have a 14 day quarantine requirement for all out of state visitors (which cannot be completed in a campground or commercial lodging).

Oregon

Recreation opportunities in Oregon are in the process of reopening.  For a detailed resource on the state of recreation areas in Oregon click here.

  • Oregon State Parks have begun opening for camping.  Most of the parks that are opening for camping start on June 9 and is reservation only.  Services will be reduced (restrooms, showers, firewood sales, camp stores, etc. may be closed or decreased availability).  Day use areas are open in some areas – click here for an interactive map of parks and their current status.   Dispersed camping is currently closed in state forests.
  • BLM – Areas are being opened to public recreation on a case by case basis; it is advisable to contact specific district offices to ensure the area you are visiting will be open to camping and recreation.
  • US National Forest Service – A phased reopening of forest service areas is in process, with Forest Service roads, trails, and dispersed areas are open on most National Forests in Oregon and Washington. The Pacific Northwest region website has contact information and links to specific areas for up to date alerts and closures. Many ranger stations and visitor centers remain closed but are available for virtual services via phone or email.
  • Mount Hood – Most day use sites are open as of May 29.  Timothy Lake campgrounds, Lost Lake, Lower Eight-Mile Crossing, Knebal Springs, Kinncikinnick (Laurance Lake), & Sherwood Campgrounds are open by reservation only.

Oregon National Parks

    • National Parks and Monuments in Oregon are currently closed.  The highway (62) through Crater Lake National Park is open to vehicle travel.

Utah

  • Utah State Parks – state parks are open for recreation and camping, reservations encouraged.  Visitor centers and public gathering areas may still be closed.
  • US Forest Service lands are open, and detailed information on campground opening status, reservations, dates, etc. can be found on the individual National Forest Service area page.  Check out this map for an easy link to each Forest Service area with current restrictions and camping/recreation information.
  • BLM – Some camping areas are open – closed areas will be gated. Field offices are closed to public. Area offices can be reached via telephone with questions or for more information regarding camping areas and land access.

Utah National Parks:

    • Arches National Park – Park roads and trails are open. Campground and visitor center remain closed.
    • Bryce Canyon National Park – Park roads and trails are open. Backcountry access is limited until July 1.  Sunset campground will reopen June 7 (reservation only).  North Campground will reopen after a paving project in the park is completed. Public restrooms are open, and a free park shuttle is also operating as parking can be extremely limited.  The summer Astronomy festival scheduled for June has been cancelled.
    • Canyonlands National Park – Park roads and trails are open.  Campgrounds and visitor center are closed.
    • Capitol Reef National Park – Park is fully open.  Visitor center restrooms are currently closed for renovations.
    • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area – Areas are reopening, with some campgrounds/RV parks open for camping.
    • Zion National Park – Some areas open for day use only with limited parking availability – parking at popular trailheads has been filling by 7 am, so plan accordingly. Watchman campground is open (reservation only), South campground and Lava Point remain closed.  Kolob canyon area is closed.  Notable hiking closures:  Angel’s landing chains, Wilderness and Recreation Permits (this includes the Subway and top-down Narrows).

Hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park

Washington

  • Washington State Parks – Some parks are open for day use and camping as of June 1, with an updated list of park status available on their website.
  • BLM – Areas are being opened to public recreation on a case by case basis; it is advisable to contact specific district offices to ensure the area you are visiting will be open to camping and recreation.
  • US National Forest Service – A phased reopening of forest service areas is in process, with Forest Service roads, trails, and dispersed areas are open on most National Forests in Oregon and Washington.  The Pacific Northwest region website has contact information and links to specific areas for up to date alerts and closures.   Many ranger stations and visitor centers remain closed but are available for virtual services via phone or email.
  • State Land – All state forests and state managed lands are open for day use recreation.  Campgrounds are undergoing phased reopening in some areas as of June 1

Washington National Parks

    • Mount Rainier – Nisqually entrance is closed to vehicles, including bicycles.  Backcountry recreation is open (up to 10,500 feet elevation only, high camps are closed).  Some park roads are open.  Campgrounds, visitors’ centers, and some restrooms remain closed as of June 1.
    • North Cascades National Park – undergoing a phased reopening for day use only.  All campgrounds and visitors’ centers remain closed as of June 1.
    • Olympic National Park – undergoing a phased reopening for day use only.  All campgrounds and visitors’ centers remain closed as of June 1.

Other National Parks

Glacier National Park

  • Currently undergoing a phased reopening for day use.   The West gate will open June 8 and will be open until 4:30 PM each day.  Campgrounds and visitor centers remain closed.  Park shuttles will not operate this season.  Going-to-the-Sun Road will be accessible as far as Lake McDonald Lodge

Yellowstone National Park

  • Both Wyoming and Montana entrances are open as of June 1.  Yellowstone has a comprehensive reopening plan;  campgrounds have not yet reopened but are anticipated to open in the coming weeks. In addition, there is construction in the park causing road closures.

Shenandoah National Park

  • Currently undergoing a phased reopening for day use.  Campgrounds and visitors’ centers remain closed.  Skyline Drive and other trails will be open from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

  • Currently undergoing a phased reopening.  Some roads, trails, and restrooms are open, campgrounds and visitor centers remain closed.

Acadia National Park

  • Currently undergoing a phased reopening. Hiking trails are open. Carriage roads will be open to pedestrians June 5.  Campgrounds are closed, with possible opening no sooner than July 1.  Through August, people entering Maine must quarantine for 14 days unless they have a recent negative COVID-19 test or are coming from Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire or Vermont.

Canada

National Parks throughout Canada have begun a phased reopening, with day use areas opening June 1. Campgrounds will remain closed until at least June 21. Visit the Parks Canada site for detailed information on specific access and closures in all of the parks.   In addition, there are many areas in mountainous regions that are still closed due to normal seasonal closures – always check with the parks before visiting!

British Columbia

  • Most campgrounds and parks within the province will be opening in early to mid-June;  click here for a list of parks and their opening dates and restrictions.

Alberta

 

In conclusion, when researching your itinerary, articles like this are a great starting point. While most visitor centers and ranger stations aren’t open to the public right now, park officials and rangers are still answering questions via phone calls and emails. However, park rangers can’t predict the future (or the weather!) any better than you can. It’s best to call a day or two before you plan to go to get the most up to date information. In addition, consider having a backup plan and be prepared for anything. Luckily, you can camp almost anywhere in a campervan!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This website stores cookies on your computer to improve the website experience and improve our personalized services to you. To find out more about these cookies and our privacy processes please see our privacy policy. By clicking Accept you are granting permission for us to store this cookie. If you do not want us to install this cookie please close your browser window now.